War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0698 OPERATIONS IN N.VA., W.VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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give you best information I can get. The rebels are now coming in to this station.

BRAYTON.

ALEXANDRIA, August 27, 1862-4.20 p.m.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President:

Intelligence received within twenty minutes informs me that the enemy are advancing and have crossed Bull Run Bridge. If it is not destroyed it probably will be. The forces sent by us last night held it until that time.

H. HAUPT.

ALEXANDRIA, August 27, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President:

Our latest information is that the Eleventh Ohio was covering the retreat, had held the bridge some time, and was retreating.

H. HAUPT.

RAILROAD DEPOT, Alexandria, Va., August 27, 1862-7 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Taylor was sent to Burke's on a hand-car and is now on his way to Alexandria. I sent engine and cars of construction train, with orders to proceed to Fairfax and bring off wounded, if possible. The engine was fired into by cavalry 2 miles west of Burke's and compelled to return without wounded. This was within the last fifteen minutes. Operator at Burke's has this moment (6.50) broken off suddenly; probably compelled to evacuate.

H. HAUPT.

WASHINGTON, August 27, 1862.

Mr. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War:

SIR: A portion of my wagons have come (about half), but none of the horses of the trains. I have no definite informations as to the place of the rest, but at the depot am informed they will be here in the course of the day.

The artillery, cavalry, and one regiment of infantry are here, and I have put them in camp on the opposite side of the Potomac till the train and horses are here, when I will move the whole forward together.

I think it best to retain this infantry regiment as escort for the train in consequence of the raids lately made. My other regiments have gone forward, and are at different points on the Warrenton railroad. They are acting temporarily as guards for the railway at the points where they are, but as soon as I can move the wagon trains so that they will have means of subsistence, it will be important that the military commandant at Alexandria, or whoever is in charge of the railroad lines, should understand that they are to be relieved.

May I ask that General Slough have instructions to this effect, so that I may not be delayed in reporting to General Pope after the regimental transportation is here?