War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0668 OPERATIONS IN N.VA., W.VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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his main body at White Plains. Can you ascertain by a scout if the enemy is still in front of Sulphur Springs, and whether he is in any force or not, and let me know immediately? Don't allow them to throw away any artillery ammunition this morning. Have the division well in hand for a move at short notice.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. THIRD ARMY CORPS, ARMY OF VIRGINIA, August 26, 1862.

Major General JOHN POPE,

Commanding Army of Virginia:

GENERAL: Will it be necessary that I should send any instructions to Reno to turn him off to take the Greenwich road? Will he not take it direct under the orders you have given him? His column will cut that of the baggage wagons, which will cause some delay.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.

WARRENTON JUNCTION, August 26, 1862.

Major-General McDOWELL:

Banks and Sigel are halted near Warrenton. Reno is here; Hooker and Kearny are here; Cox and Sturgis are arriving. You will have any support you need, and what you have done is approved.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

TELEGRAPH OFFICE, August 26, 1862-8.20 p.m.

Major-General McDOWELL:

The operator at Manassas reported at 8 p.m. that a body of the enemy's cavalry had rushed into that place, firing into the train there, immediately after our line was opened. I infer from this the rebels have cut the wire. My inference is correct. We can still communicate with Warrenton Junction. The operator at the latter place tells me the circuit on the military and railroad wires is gone north of him. Will inform you if I hear further.

W. H. ECKMAN.

PICKET FRONT, SULPHUR SPRINGS BRIDGE, August 26, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that no firing occurred on my front during the night. The sound of baggage wagons and artillery were heard during the night. This morning my scouts advanced beyond where their batteries were planted. Cavalry vedettes were observed about 1 1/2 miles in our front, but disappeared on the approach of the pickets.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. F. ROGERS,

Colonel Twenty-first New York Volunteers.