War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0595 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Thus far we have saved everything and abandoned nothing. All quiet; not a shot yet been fired.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Barrett's Ferry, August 18, 1862-1 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

The pontoon bridge is now dismantled and ready to be towed to Fortress Monroe. The last of the rear guard crossed at 10 a. m. Nothing was left behind and probably the last straggler has arrived. Nothing seen of the enemy to-day. All is quiet. The only troops now remaining on the banks of the Chickahominy are Pleasonton's cavalry. I think I can now say that the critical part of the movement is successfully completed. I will now push everything to Yorktown and Monroe with all possible dispatch. All the army will be at or beyond Williamsburg this evening except the

cavalry of Sumner's corps.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Williamsburg, August 18, 1862-5 p. m.

(Received August 19, 10.30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

All quiet and the movement a perfect success. Second Corps encamped 3 miles this side of Barrett's Ferry, and will be here to-morrow evening; Third Corps here also; Fourth, Sixth, and Fifth Corps at Fort Monroe and Newport News, probably embarking now.

Pleasonton's cavalry brigade this side of Barrett's Ferry; Averell's near New Kent Court-House. I will now move leisurely, but will be sure to have the troops ready to embark as fast as transports are on hand. Please hurry horse transports and those for batteries. I propose leaving a sufficient garrison in Yorktown and Gloucester, also at Suffolk and Fort Monroe. Will give my personal attention to these points without delay. Will hold this place with cavalry at least.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

Newport News, Va., August 18, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, Commanding:

GENERAL: I found on arrival at Williamsburg on the 16th instant the whole community under high excitement-the Union people depressed and alarmed; the secessionists exultant, and from various sources, some worthy of credit, threatening and producing alarm by circulating rumors of attack. All this arose from the pressure caused by the presence of Colonel Campbell's command having been removed. To quiet apprehensions and to check the increasing disposition to cause trouble, I notified the two persons I sent to you (Colonel Durfee and Mr. Cole) that I should hold them as hostages for the good behavior of their friends. These two persons I caused to be arrested, the former for hav-