War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0535 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Covington or Jackson's River (on maps James River really), and thence, by the way of Warm Springs and Augusta Springs to Harrisonburg, at which place he can readily join this command. The road is good, and he reports that he will be able to make the march to Harrisonburg within ten days. Though somewhat hazardous, I should prefer that instead of the route I have mentioned. He should pursue the turnpike from Covington to Lexington and thence to Staunton, for its effect in threatening Lynchburg and the railroad leading west from Richmond. Will you please advise me at once what you think of the movement?

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA,

Near Sperryville, August 5, 1862-11.30 a. m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Several soldiers belonging to the Ohio regiments of this command, who were taken prisoners by the enemy at Port Republic in June last, made their escape and came into our lines yesterday from Lynchburg, where they have been confined. They report one regiment at Lynchburg and a large number of sick and wounded sent back from Richmond. Re-enforcements are daily passing through for Jackson in large numbers.

Two of our scouts returned from Louisa Court-House last night. Longstreet passed through day before yesterday to Gordonsville. He was seen by our scouts. His division has been passing through Louisa Court-House for several days. A. P. Hill was between Gordonsville and Louisa Court-House with 9,000 men. Jackson's force from various sources of information is reported to have been full 50,000, though I think the number to be overestimated. It is certain, however, that he has his own division, re-enforced by the Sixth Georgia and Second Alabama Regiments, Ewell's division, Whiting's division, Longstreet's division, A. P. Hill's division, and four regiments of Ashbey's cavalry, under Robertson, which have hitherto been in the Shenandoah Valley. The strength of these divisions it is next to impossible to ascertain.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA,

Near Sperryville, August 5, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief U. S. Army:

GENERAL: I commence the forward movement from my present position to-morrow.

McDowell, with one division of his army corps (the other is King's, at Fredericksburg), moves from Warrenton direct to Culpeper. General Banks moves due south to the pike from Sperryville to Culpeper, and pursues the pike to the crossing of Hazel River.

As soon as these forces are at the points specified the whole of the army will move forward to the line of Robertson's River. The First Corps, now at Sperryville, to occupy the north side of the river, a little northeast of Madison Court-House; the Second Corps, a point half way between the First and the railroad crossing of Rapidan River (mouth of Crooked River); the Third at the railroad crossing.