War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0461 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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FRONT ROYAL, VA., July 9, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I want to join my troops in the direction of Luray to day, especially if we have any fight; but I am extremely envious to open communication by telegraph from here to Washington. Am endeavoring to do it, but line seems to be down. Will try to get a party, with guard, down the railroad toward Manassas. Cannot a party be sent up immediately, by a train, to repair the lien? And we must have transportation by rail as soon as possible for stores from Alexandria here. I have got forward all the little forage I could from Winchester, but artillery and cavalry horses are literally starving in the field.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding First Army Corps.

MIDDLETOWN, VA., July 9, 1862.

General ROBERT C. SCHENCK,

Commanding First Corps, Army of Virginia:

SIR: I have the honor to report as follows: I have loaded over 100 teams, which is all I have. The enemy are in sight on the opposite side of Cedar Creek, and are working to cut off my retreat to Front Royal, and by and with the advice of the commanding officers of the various corps I will fall back toward Winchester and come around by the way of Newtown.

General Piatt is hastening to my rescue, and I have no doubt of perfect ability to take care of my men. If we are forced to leave we will have to destroy some Government property, say 20 wagon loads, but not of a very valuable character-rations, &c.

Trusting that my course will suit you and meet your approbation, I am, your most obedient servant,

WM. LOOMIS DE BECK,

Captain, Commanding Forces at Middletown, Va.

FRONT ROYAL, VA., July 9, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

I found it necessary to have 250 wagons to remove stores from Middletown. I hope all will be finished and the town emptied to-day. A panic there last night about enemy at Strasburg. I believed it was causeless, but I sent back two companies of Indiana cavalry, and orders to General Piatt to give aid from Winchester, if necessary. The Fourth New York Cavalry is still there.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,.

FRONT ROYAL, VA., July 9, 1862.

Colonel GEORGE D. RUGGLESS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I Received early this morning the following report from General Milroy, dated from camp, on Jeremies River, yesterday:

From various sources of information I am led to believe that there is a considerable force at Luray (form at least 3,000 to 5,000 strong), under Generals White, Ewell, and