War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0401 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WINCHESTER. VA., June 17, 1862.

E. M. STANTON:

Major-General Fremont reports that Jackson has crossed at Port Republic to the west side on the 15th, in the morning, whilst a smaller force is advancing on the east side of the Shenandoah. Will the two brigades now at Front Royal leave or remain there, and can I dispose of them temporarily? It is of great importance to know this.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, June 17, 1862-1.30 p. m.

General FRANZ SIGEL, Winchester, Va.:

Your dispatch received. It is not possible just now to detail McDowell's brigade at Front Royal; pressure elsewhere prevents it. In case of necessity, Fremont has orders to fall back near to line we contemplated. I fear re-enforcements are out of the question at this moment. There seems to be good will to grant all asked, but at present many are wanting. Materials for bridge or additional ferries will be forwarded at once for Shenandoah. Will telegraph again this evening. Nothing new from South. Major Copeland has key to cipher.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, June 17, 1862.

General SIGEL, Winchester:

The forces at Front Royal are there by order of the President. When he desires their position to be changed the order will be given by him.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WINCHESTER, June 17, 1862-11.35 p. m.

(Received June 18, 8.15.)

Major-General FREMONT,

Commanding Department:

I moved to Middletown to-day with my division. A part of General Banks' troops is opposite Front Royal; another part behind my division. Our common safety consists in a junction of our forces, and I think we can easily effect it by concentrating at Cedar Creek. General Banks telegraphs from Washington that it is left to you to retire if found necessary. General Banks will be here to-morrow.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

WINCHESTER, June 17, 1862-10.30 a. m.

Major-General BANKS:

Captain Asmussen just returned from Fremont's headquarters. Only 9,000 men. Very much disorganized. Without wholes or supplies. Fremont ordered to remain at Mount Jackson, or he would fall back as you

20 R R-VOL XII, PT III