War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0372 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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hope to be within reach of ample supplies. What I want at Luray is shoes and stockings. I find that about half of my command is barefoot and foot-sore. Hard bread and salt is indispensable to take us to Catlett's. Our ment fought like devils. The enemy suffered terribly. The odds were overwhelming. The officer, Colonel Carroll, neglected to burn five weeks ago deceived me. He held it three-quarters of an hour, and wanted the good sense to burn it. They took up an indefensible position afterward instead of falling back to a defensible one. But notwithstanding these blunders the men behaved nobly; left the ground in perfect order; brought off everything but the guns, which had to be abandoned, the horses being killed. Eight pieces they report abandoned.

I had concerted a combined attack with General Fremont next day, which must have proved successful. The positive and peremptory orders compelled me to come on.

Please let General McDowell know that my artillery needs refitting, and to let me have the Napoleon guns if possible.

I will have a perfect memorandum of our wants forwarded you from Luray as soon as I have time to halt.

JAS. SHIELDS,

Major-General, Commanding Division.

WINCHESTER, VA., June 11, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

A reliable man, who left Harrisonburg on Monday, the 9th, reports that our troops advanced on Monday evening beyond the battle-field, following Jackson on his retreat, and that it was said General Shields had attacked Jackson. The bearer of these reports says that he himself heard the firing of cannon on Monday morning at 10 o'clock. I examined the man myself. He belongs to Blenker's division.

F. SIGEL,

Major-General.

LURAY, June 12, 1862.

Major-General McDOWELL:

Received telegram directing my division to remain at Luray until relived by General Banks. Arrived here this day.

JAS. SHIELDS,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SHENANDOAH,

Winchester, June 12, 1862-1.30 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Fremont's chief of staff reports that they have beaten Jackson in two engagements and that Shields has been beaten on the opposite side of the river. Jackson has been re-enforced to the number of 30,000 or 35,000 men, including Smith's and Longstreet's divisions, in