War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0319 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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In order to prevent a recurrence of the trouble of yesterday, I would suggest that your order a telegraph instrument to be placed at General McCall's headquarters for all business pertaining to army movements, and the office in Fredericksburg be used only for railway purposes. I will leave here at 7 a. m. for Washington, unless otherwise ordered.

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

FREDERICKSBURG, June 1, 1862 - 6 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I find that General McDowell's orders to General McCall confine him strictly to defensive operations. Some portion of Jackson's army may retreat in this direction, and McCall should be allowed to use his judgment in regard to striking them. Please have this arranged immediately. The command here is a good one and anxious to see service.

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 1, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Baltimore:

Be prepared to receive orders to-day to relieve General Wool of command at Fort Monroe and to turn over your command to him. You will be expected to be ready to go to-day.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

BALTIMORE, June 1, 1862 - 6 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I did not look at my orders until I was on my way to Baltimore. I find to my surprise that I am taken from an independent position to be placed in a subordinate one. The change cannot be regarded by the public in any other light than that of a censure and a degradation. I beg you to let me take General Wool's command as it was, with instructions to send to General McClellan all the troops I can spare.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, June 1, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Baltimore:

The change of your command was determined by the President himself. The order was prepared by his direction in my absence. I did not advert to the effect of it, but know that nothing could have been further from the President's purpose than to displease, much less offend, you. I will show him your telegram and leave him to answer it.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.