War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0318 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,

Front Royal, Va., June 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General BAYARD,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

GENERAL: Your report by special messenger to General McDowell has been received. I send herewith copy of instructions to General Augur for your information, with the general's directions that you do not relax your efforts against the enemy in consequence of this new order.

It has occurred to General McDowell that as the firing which was heard this morning was between the enemy and some of our own forces under either General Fremont or General Banks, and as we are in pursuit of them, and as they now may be in or near Strasburg, you must be particular in your procedure lest you should go against our own troops.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,

Front Royal, Va., June 1, 1862.

Brigadier General C. C. AUGUR,

Commanding Brigade:

GENERAL: You will repair with the regiments now with you to Strasburg, and there take command of the troops in and around that town, with which Major-General McDowell directs that you proceed against any force of the enemy that may be there according to your best judgment.

Report to these headquarters as frequently as anything occurs which it is proper the general should know.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

FRONT ROYAL, June 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General KING:

The enemy has flown. General McDowell directs that you halt your division wherever it may be on receipt of this message.

ED. SCHRIVER,

Chief of Staff.

FREDERICKSBURG, June 1, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Arrived at General McCall's headquarters at 4.30 a. m. There has been no trouble in this command, and the general commanding is satisfied there is no enemy in his vicinity. He will maintain strong guards in Fredericksburg, with picket lines extended at least 7 miles beyond the city; in addition to which his patrols of cavalry go 10 to 12 miles south of Fredericksburg and to the fords at junction of rivers above.