War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0267 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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WASHINGTON, May 28, 1862 - 3.20 p. m.

Major-General MCDOWELL, Manassas:

Are you aware that there are but 300 cavalry under General Wadsworth's command, and do you, as commander of this department, consider that an adequate force under present circumstances for the safety of Washington? General Wadsworth says that it is by your orders that the force here has been so much reduced. Please answer immediately.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK,

Manassas, May 28, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Washington:

General Geary reports this a. m. that his scouts find nothing of the enemy this side of the Blue Ridge. Nothing else of importance.

IRVIN MCDOWELL,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, May 28, 1862 - 4 p. m.

General MCDOWELL, Manassas Junction:

You say General Geary's scouts report that they find no enemy this side of the Blue Ridge. Neither do I. Have they been to the Blue Ridge looking for them?

A. LINCOLN.

MANASSAS, May 28, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Cavalry reconnaissance beyond Warrenton shows no sings of the enemy in that direction.

IRVIN MCDOWELL,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, May 28, 1862 - 5.40 p. m.

General MCDOWELL, Manassas Junction:

I think the evidence now preponderates that Ewell and Jackson are still about Winchester. Assuming this, it is for you a question of legs. Put in all the speed you can. I have told Fremont as much, and directed him to drive at them as fast as possible. By the way, I suppose you know Fremont has got up to Moorefield, instead of going to Harrisonburg.

A. LINCOLN.

MANASSAS, May 28, 1862.

(Received 5.45 p. m.)

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

I beg leave to report, in reply to your telegram of this morning directing me to consider whether my force in front of Fredericksburg