War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0263 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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the pursuit, following our army but a few miles with their infantry. They will probably drive back General Geary, destroying the railroad, and when met by superior force will retire to Warrenton pike, between Springville and Warrenton. The force between 20,000 and 25,000 infantry and cavalry, with between forty and fifty pieces of artillery. Can hear nothing of any considerable force between here Winchester. Refugees and stragglers coming in constantly. Think I cannot be mistaken.

Respectfully, yours,

JOHN S. CLARK,

Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

HARPER'S FERRY,

May 27, 1862 - 4 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Deserters and stragglers from vicinity of Charlestown, Berryville, and Winchester report no bodies of rebel infantry in this portion of the valley. Some few parties of cavalry are returning up the valley. One numbering 40 or 50 passed through Charlestown to-day. A small party were at Shepherdstown yesterday, probably a portion of the same. Have heard nothing to-day to change the opinion expressed this morning that the main body had retreated over the Blue Ridge.

Respectfully,

JOHN S. CLARK,

Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

HARPER'S FERRY, May 27, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The emergency having passed for which you desire my special services, I shall you direct otherwise, report to General Banks for my usual staff duty. Nothing later has changed my opinion that the main body of rebels has passed out of the valley, as I telegraphed this morning. The railroad bridge across the Opequon is perfect. Road probably uninjured. Small squads of cavalry are occasionally reported going south.

JOHN S. CLARK,

Colonel Aide-de-Camp.

CLARKSBUBRG, VA., May 27, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Received a dispatch from my assistant adjutant-general last night from Cumberland, advising me that the rebels were in Martinsburg, but could give me no information as to their number or movements. Later he advised me that the telegraph line was not working east of Sir John's Run, and that the Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Regiment, guarding the railroad from Martinsburg to South Branch Bridge, in Hampshire County, had fallen back to that point. I therefore infer that Jackson's advance had taken possession of the railroad and telegraph as far west as Sir John's Run. This is all the information I have, and the first I have received