War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0253 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

May 26, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Baltimore:

Thanks for your prompt attention. We are sending also some heavier guns from here, and will replace your battery. The artillery train will leave here in a couple of hours, but do not wait for it, but press yours forward.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

May 26, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

The reports indicating that the enemy are operating in force at Winchester will require you to exercise extreme vigilance upon the movements in Baltimore in your present weakened condition. It is doubtless unnecessary to warn you on this subject in reference to Fort McHenry and your other fortifications, as I suppose you are well advised of the operations on Banks' line.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

BALTIMORE, May 26, 1862.

(Received May 26, 8.48 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

You may have heard that there has been some disturbance here yesterday and to-day. It is, I think, now over. It did not amount to a riot. It was a crusade of the Union men against the secessionists. The military has been under arms, and I could have cleared the streets at any moment. I have all the powers I need, and shall use them if the proper time comes.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,

May 26, 1862.

Brigadier-General BAYARD, Commanding Cavalry, and General M. R. PATRICK:

You will move your brigade at 7 o'clock to-morrow morning along the Telegraph road to Mattapony River to ascertain the condition of the bridge across that stream, and, if possible, the exact direction of the enemy's retreat. Endeavor to collect all the information from contrabands, deserters, and others of the strength and destination of the force recently in our front. Push the reconnaissance as far as may be necessary to obtain the desired intelligence, but with the understanding you are to return to the camp you now occupy before night-fall. Let your men go in light marching order. Look well to your flank, and leave enough behind to guard your camp and train. Report to me the result of the reconnaissance on your return to camp.

Very respectfully.

RUFUS KING,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.