War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0236 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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started the first train for troops from Washington, and others will follow as rapidly as possible to load 4,000, as ordered, this evening. If desired, we can accomplish more transportation than yet required, both from Washington and Baltimore. Your wishes shall continue to receive our most prompt and effective attention. In response to a dispatch inquiring whether our mail train could get through from Baltimore this p. m., Colonel Miles just telegraphed from Harper's Ferry, viz: "You cannot run a train beyond this place. From what I can learn I suppose by this time Martinsburg is in possession of the enemy. I shall try and hold this point." Cannot General Fremont aid in saving the road west of Martinsburg-particularly bridges? I have your instructions regarding machinery of Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore and Northern Central roads, in which I will act as necessity may require.

J. W. GARRETT,

President.

CAMDEN STATION, Baltimore, May 25, 1862.

(Received 7.10 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have arranged to meet Mr. Watson at the Relay House. The Delaware regiment and Purnell Legion are loaded and just starting from the station. In addition to our arrangements for transporting 4,000 men from Washington this evening and night, I am directing such movements as will enable me to transport 10,000 men during to-morrow, commencing early in the morning. I have deemed this judicious in view of your possible requirements. Should you decide on further movements early notice as to points of departure will facilitate our ability to serve you.

J. W. GARRETT,

President.

BALTIMORE, May 25, 1862.

(Received 8.20 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Whilst the advices from Harper's Ferry indicate that the enemy is in possession of Martinsburg, we find our dispatches coming through from points west of Martinsburg, thus proving our wires still uninterrupted. I learn from our superintendent of telegraph that the Government wires through Darnestown have been broken and that your operations were using the railroad wire. I beg to suggest, under these circumstances, caution in sending your messages, as they may be heard and copied at Martinsburg, and thus place the enemy in possession of your instructions. Your operators may have avoided this risk by ordering the ground wire on at Harper's Ferry, in which case our suggestion will do no harm.

J. W. GARRETT,

President.