War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0213 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

WESTON, LEWIS COUNTY, VA.,

May 19, 1862.

Colonel J. C. RATHBONE,

Eleventh Virginia Regiment, Commanding Forces at Spencer:

Your communication inclosing memorandum of an agreement entered into between yourself and Captain George Downs, commanding the Confederate States Rangers, has just been received. I most unqualifiedly disapproves of the whole arrangement.

You will at once give notice that the armistice is revoked, and that the only terms that will be entered into with Captain Downs and his men is that if they will return to their homes and families, and in good faith lay down their arms and take the oath of allegiance to support the Government of the United States as established by our fathers, and the government of Virginia as reorganized, that then you will protect them in their persons and property, they, of course, being, at all times subject to obey any and all proceedings of the civil courts, whether State or Federal.

If they refuse to do this you will move at once on them and kill or capture their whole force if possible.

Yours, &c.,

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

Numbers 5.] FLAT TOP. May 21, 1862.

(Received May 23, 1862, 11 a. m.)

Colonel ALBERT TRACY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Franklin:

My conjecture of the enemy's movement proves true. They have not advanced beyond Princeton, but divided the force, so as to watch the Kentucky line and the direction of Monroe Country as well as this direction.

I have a party at Pack's Ferry examining the chances of co-operating with Colonel Crook by that line. Crook had made a dash at Covington and Jackson Station; found the force gone to Newborn from there; destroyed some railroad bridges, took some stores, and returned safely to Lewisburg. All the troops this side of Staunton had been sent down to my front. I have ordered him to remain at Lewisburg, and propose to co-operate with me [him] as soon as I can prepare to advance again. I can take care of myself here against the whole of the enemy's force, but, as already stated, should have strong post behind in case of advancing. The receipt and organization of the new transportation at Gauley Bridge progresses with desperate slowness.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURG,

May 22, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Major-General Shields' command has arrived here.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.