War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0206 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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but he has not yet succeeded in collecting the whole of the 5,000 already authorized, and there are none in this vicinity which can be spared from the army operating against Richmond. Indeed, contracts are out to bring several thousand horses for the armies of the Potomac and Rappahannock. I notice that General Schenck reported that in his advanced position he found all forage exhausted. This was, I presume, one reason compelling a retrograde movement.

Multiplication of horses in these ca~non-mountain regions increases the difficulty of operating.

The cost of 200 wagons delivered at Wheeling will be above $24,000; of 800 horses, $88,000; total, $112,000.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF KANAWHA,

Camp Flat Top, May 19, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel COLEMAN:

Be very watchful on the Wyoming side. Call in your forces and prepare to hold your position stubbornly. Spare no pains to get information and keep me advised. Heavy demonstrations in that direction make me withdraw to Flat Top. If needful I will send a regiment back to Raleigh.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF KANAWHA,

Camp Flat Top, May 19, 1862.

Colonel J. A. J. LIGHTBURN, Charleston:

The detachment should be kept at Chapmanville, of possible. I will try to get extra teams for them. The old arrangement should be kept up. I know of no reason for changing it. Make the people of the Guyandotte Valley fell your presence and power. I have retired to this place simply because I found my lines of communications were at the mercy of the enemy, being intersected by roads flanking us in every direction, and we could not protect our trains without reducing the army by detachments. The rebels under Marshall took Princeston from a detachment of four companies. When I found the enemy were pushing in forces I went to the front and brought back Moor's brigade and drove them out. I then concentrated all my force, and inasmuch as the enemy was stronger than we expected, having been largely reenforced, as is reported from East Virginia, I concluded to come here, where we can reach Pack's Ferry road, Raleigh, &c.

I am very anxious to protect the Guyandotte Valley and not allow bushwhackers to harbor there. Do not lat facts be known which may go to the enemy to interfere with our operations, but see also that ridiculous stories about our movements are flatly contradicted.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.