War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0163 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

The sharp fight on the hills at McDowell prevented Jackson from pursuing in force. My cavalry had a slight skirmish with a few of his last night. Nothing hurt, except two rebel horses killed. Will telegraph frequently as soon as communication is restored.

I apprehend that Jackson and Johnson may go westward to Huntersville and perhaps may center, if they can get transportation and forage, which will by very difficult for them, toward Philippi or in that direction, and then we might return and get in his rear and cut him off or shut him in.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Brigadier-General.

No. 3.] FRANKLIN, May 10, 1862.

(Received 5.30 p. m.)

Colonel ALBERT TRACY:

Lieutenant-Colonel Downey arrived to-day. I suppose we shall have no other help, but must depend on ourselves and defend as we can. We may find that less dangerous than to attempt falling back. We cannot move encumbered with so many wounded and our quantities of baggage.

No scouts of yours have reported to me here.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Brigadier-General.

CAMP MILROY, Franklin, May 10, 1862.

(Received 10.45 p. m.)

Colonel ALBERT TRACY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have certain information that the rebels have a strong picket advanced to within 9 miles of my camp on the road from Monterey, and near the place where we encamped last night. More than 100 infantry were seen there by a reliable scouting party an noon to-day, and there might by, they said, many more. Three of General Milroy's best scouts, who were sent in the direction of Staunton last Monday, have just returned. They ascertained that Jackson's and Johnson's united forces amounted to 14,000, and were being re-enforced three days ago by troops arriving in trains at Staunton; they know of three long trains full. We have some apprehensions that an attempt may be made to send a force around between you and us. It will be best, I think, if you can get forward your additional force and Blenker's division as fast as possible.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD,

Petersburg, May 10, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHENCK, Franklin:

Do you still think Jackson's forces are opposed to you? Secretary of War says that General McDowell reports Jackson to be in his front. What is the latest information in regard to the enemy?

ALBERT TRACY,

Colonel, and Assistant Adjutant-General.