War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0161 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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o'clock a. m., unless otherwise directed. Our route will be from here to Luray, thence to Front Royal, where was hope to get a supply of forage by railroad cars; thence by Chester Gap to Warrenton. I learn that the railroad transportation will not suffice, so I go by turnpike. We will need forage and, say, two days' rations at Warrenton; 1,000 horseshoes and nails, if possible.

In my dispatch od yesterday I gave the number of horses-2,500. We will pick up what forage we can, but there is little on the route.

The forces of the enemy in this valley are all preparing, in my opinion, to retreat to Charlottesville. If I could be supported and supplied at Culpeper Court-House and move by Gordonsville to Charlottesville I might destroy the road and cut off their retreat. All their baggage is there now.

With sentiments of respect, your obedient servant,

JAS. SHIELD,

Major-General, Commanding Division.

CATLETT'S, May 10, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

A reconnaissance sent to intersect Rappahannock half way between railroad bridge and river has returned. Struck river at Ellis' Mill, 10 miles from Elk Runk, and followed down to Spottsville. Found a ford near Mrs. Marshall's, where rebel cavalry crossed on 8th instant and captured 6 Federal prisoners. Not known where they were from nor what doing. Very few white men at home, and women all secessionists; some of them bitterly so. Treated soldiers very coldly. Roads below Elk Run good, and some planting going on.

Respectfully,

GEO. L. HARTSUFF,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DETACHED BRIGADE,

Near Rectortown, Va., May 10, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

I have the honor to report that yesterday I explored the Blue Mountain in all its recesses form Paris to Manassas Gap, and found the secret rendezvous of guerrilla cavalry, but evacuated within the last two days. I now have these bodies south of the Manassas Gap, having continually pressed them while in the neighborhood of the railroad. I will continue these researches until I drive them from all their fastness, and in the mountains between Front Royal and the Rappahannock. Their numbers are not large, and their force partakes of the nature of bandits. The road is in good running order, and nothing has occurred to disturb the peace of the locality.

Very respectfully,

JNO. W. GEARY,

Colonel Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DETACHED BRIGADE,

Near Rectortown, May 10, 1862.

Major-General MCDOWELL:

I would respectfully call your attention to the fact that my command

11 R R-VOL XII, PT III