War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0145 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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forces and the progress made in completing the route are unknown to me. I think every effort, however, consistent with ordinary precaution, should be made to get Gordonsville as speedily as possible.

I would most respectfully solicit an answer to these queries before 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

JAS. SHIELDS,

Major-General, Commanding Division.

HEADQUARTERS ADVANCED BRIGADE,

Near Rectortown, Va., May 8, 1862.

Major-General McDOWELL,

Fredericksburg:

In obedience to telegram just received to telegraph substance of report sent on 6th instant I beg to state my force is disposed as follows: Four companies of cavalry take charge of railroad from Plains to Rectortown, patrolling it. My headquarters are 1 1/2 miles west of Rectortown, near the large bridge over Goose Creek, where I have seven companies of infantry and one of artillery. Two companies of infantry and one of cavalry are located at Piedmont, two of infantry at Markham, and four of infantry and one of cavalry from Linden to the Shenandoah. The latter guard the workmen engaged upon the bridge over the river and the stores of forage and subsistence recently deposited at that place. The Zouaves d'Afrique, General Banks' body guard, are temporarily with me. The railroad is in good running order. Quite a number of guerrillas are still south of us, rendering it necessary to maintain a very vigilant surveillance of the entire line. A consolidated morning report was sent you with communication. Everything is quiet upon the line to-day.

Very respectfully,

JNO. W. GEARY,

Colonel Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT,

May 8, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

General Cox telegraphs that his advance, consisting of part of the Twenty-third Ohio, under Major Comly, occupied Giles Court-House and the Narrows of the New River yesterday, driving out the rebels, who were taken by surprise. A considerable quantity of commissary stores was taken, and a lieutenant-colonel, a major, and some 20 privates made prisoners. The surprise prevented the burning of the place, as the rebels intended. The citizens remain, and most of them seem loyally disposed. He adds that the reverses of the enemy at Camp Creek increase in importance as they become more known.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

10 R R-VOL XII, PT III.