War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0133 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

and that the Twenty-third Ohio marched 22 miles that day over bad roads.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

(Same to General Banks.)

CHARLESTON, May 4, 1862.

Colonel ALBERT TRACY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, New Creek:

Dispatch received. No troops except Colonel Crook's are now nearer Sutton than Gauley Bridge. His are, in fact, the only ones available for the execution at Sutton. I do not know what troops are there, as it is out of my district. From Gauley Bridge to Sutton is nearly 70 miles, and a very had road.

J. D. COX,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT,

May 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General MILROY, Monterey:

General Banks informs me that he occupies Harrisonburg. He adds that Jackson has been seen moving toward Port Republic, and suggests that his intention may possibly be to join Johnson and attack you. You will keep your scouts and reconnoitering parties actively engaged. Lieutenant-Colonel Harris will make another incursion into Webster County on Thursday next. Can you co-operate with him by sending any force into that county at the same time?

Two hundred yards of the Galley line telegraph wire was taken away yesterday morning at 10 o'clock near Francis; 200 armed rebels reported to have crossed the road near Francis at the same time. Protect your cannon coming from Elkwater.

J. C. FREMONT,

[Major-General].

HEADQUARTERS SCHENCK'S BRIGADE,

May 4, 1862.

Colonel ALBERT TRACY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, New Creek:

Have been able to get my whole brigade over the river; the wagons and artillery, by a ford near the burnt bridge, deep but not bad, and the infantry by a bridge of wagons. Am to-night encamped within 11 miles of Franklin. The road from Petersburg this far is very good, and I ascertain that it continues to be so to Monterey, except the last 2 miles next to that place. The burnt bridge crossed where the river, reduced to be about 100 feet in width, passes into a mountain gap. The wood part is entirely gone, but could be rebuilt by a sufficient force in two or three days. The stone abutments are still standing. The span is 140 feet, but is not essentially necessary to rebuild.

The crossing at Petersburg is much the worst, but by to-morrow night the boat, 45 feet long, which I had commenced building there, will be finished.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Brigadier-General.