War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0119 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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at notice. Supplies follow by three lines-Strasburg, Front Royal, Warrenton Junction. Our advance will clear whole country of the enemy north of Gordonsville. Enemy's force there far less than represented in newspapers-not more than 20,000 at outside. Jackson's army reduced, demoralized, on half rations. They are all concentrating for Richmond. The movement suggested will enable you to concentrate our forces there whenever you desire. Looking upon this at first with doubt, I am now satisfied that it is the most safe and effective disposition possible for our corps. I pray your favorable consideration. Such order will electrify our force.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

WHEELING, VA., April 30, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Agreeably to orders from General Carfield, on or about March 20, Colonel Cranor, commanding 1,200 men at Piketon, Ky., continues to report to him. I infer that all the force in that portion of my department are acting under the orders of General Buell, but I feel it my duty to suggest that this force, with a large quantity of stores, is much exposed. I think re-enforcements may be necessary to enable it to maintain its position, which reports, by an officer sent me by Colonel Cranor, inform me its threatened by 12,000 rebels, under Floyd and Marshall. If General Morgan is doing anything in anticipation of this demonstration on the part of the enemy I am not informed. I learn that four batteries are being organized at Indianapolis. Could one battery and three regiments be sent thence to Piketon?

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

WHEELING, VA., April 30, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Dispatch of to-day just received. I repeat the following report, sent yesterday morning, viz: General Milroy reports that his scouts have been within 7 miles of Staunton. Johnson was still retreating, and was said to be on his way to join Jackson. A foraging party of 26 wagons sent out by General Milroy six days ago to Bull Pasture, 12 miles from McDowell, became water-bound, and was attacked by guerrillas and destroyed, only 10 horses escaping. Three soldiers are thus far known to have been badly wounded. A detachment has been sent to Bull Pasture. The advance of General Cox's forces under Colonel Scammon found intrenchments on the east side of the New River, opposite. The rebels had strong breastworks and rifle pits. They retreated on the approach of Colonel Scammon, whose pickets are now within 2 miles of Flat Top. No change since yesterday's report. I have heard nothing further from Milroy. Streams along the Moorefield and Franklin road continue impassable. Hope to have Blenker's division at Moorefield by end of the week. Will hereafter number all telegrams sent to yourself, this being No. 1.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.