War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0099 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, D. C., April 23, 1862.

Major-General McDOWELL:

The President desires that you should not throw your force across the Rappahannock at present, but that you should get your bridges and transportation all ready and wait further orders.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

NEW MARKET, April 23, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The freshest have carried away two bridges just completed between Strasburg and Front Royal, the railway bridges at Harper's Ferry, the Opequon this side of Martinsburg, and, we fear, others above Martinsburg. Jackson is believed to be at Stanardsville. Supplies of flour, beef, and forage begin to be plenty. General Johnson said to be retreating from Shenandoah Mountain toward Staunton with about 4,000.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

(Same to Fremont.)

HARPER'S FERRY, April 23, 1862.

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Hope you will pardon me for suggesting every day's delay of Banks' division costs $30,000. That sum would finish the railroad to Mount Jackson. There is a builder of wire suspension bridges in Philadelphia, named E. S. Burton, who put up one for me 600 feet long in two weeks from day of notice. The wire of this can be hauled away if necessary. It would be a vast saving to order these bridges made at once.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

HARPER'S FERRY, April 23, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have my orders from you and General Fremont's accord to take Blenker's division to Moorefield, which, unless otherwise directed, I shall do with the least possible delay. The supplies I am getting are necessary to fit the column for motion and campaign. I am determined to see that nothing necessary is wanting before I leave. Clothing, stationery, camp tools, and shelter-tents are now all ordered and under way. Battery horses will reach them to-morrow night. Have, from delicacy, said nothing to General Fremont. My general views are as given in my report: A clearing of the valley and concentration