War of the Rebellion: Serial 018 Page 0093 Chapter XXIV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WHEELING, VA., April 19, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Rosecrans reports to-day from Harper's Ferry as follows:

Pleased to say we are bivouacked 5 miles out of Winchester, after thirty-eight days without tents or shelter. Troops wanting shoes too badly to move, but full of energy, with few sick. Wait for shoes, provisions, and forage. Horses much jaded and nearly starved.

Here ends the telegram. Will his wants be supplied from Washington?

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

WHEELING, VA., April 19, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

In the position now occupied by General Blenker's division I would suggest that the whole be paid, clothed, and furnished with tents, and such teams and wagons as can be spared, direct from Washington; each regiment or sufficient body to be marched to Moorefield by the direct road immediately on being paid and supplied. If approved, I will send an officer to aid in conducting the division.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT,

April 19, 1862.

Brigadier General ROBERT C. SCHENCK, Moorefield:

General Milroy telegraphs that the enemy, numbering about 3,500, with two batteries, including two rifled guns, are fortifying themselves on the crest of Shenandoah.

Do not diverge too much to your left, but advance with your whole force as speedily as possible to Franklin, leaving sufficient force at Romney and Moorefield to be relieved by the Eighth Virginia.

J. C. FREMONT.

CHARLESTON, April 19, 1862.

Colonel E. P. SCAMMON,

Raleigh Court-House:

If you have an opportunity to act offensively with success it is of course what we desire, but the crossing of New River with such insufficient ferries as exist would not be prudent in the face of any force. On my printed map a road is marked from mouth of Blue Stone to Raleigh; does such a road exist? All the ferries and fords must be kept so closely watched that there will be no possibility of the enemy's getting behind you. Report particularly about the ferries, &c., and give to Lieutenant-Colonel Toland, of Thirty-fourth, the points he should watch on the river. Movements must be carefully calculated with reference to our means of transportation; we have not the means