War of the Rebellion: Serial 017 Page 1053 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, March 22, 1862.

Recorded, volume 17, page 67.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

The President of the United States of America to all who shall see these presents, greeting:

Know ye that, reposing special trust and confidence in the patriotism, valor, fidelity, and abilities of Fitz John Porter, I have nominated, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint him major-general of volunteers in the service of the United States, to rank as such from the 4th day of July, 1862. He is, therefore, carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of major-general, by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging. And I do strictly charge and require all officers and soldiers under his command to be obedient to his orders as major-general. And he is to observe and follow such orders and directions, from time to time, as he shall receive from me, or the future President of the United States of America, or the general, or other superior officers set over him, according to the rules and discipline of war. This commission to continue in force during the pleasure of the President of the United States for the time being.

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, this 16th day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and in the eighty-seventh year of the Independence of the United States.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, December 19, 1862.

Official copy.

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, July 16, 1862.

Recorded, volume 17, page 85.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

[Government Exhibited C.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, D. C., January 5, 1863.

Major-General HUNTER, President, &c.:

GENERAL: The state of the service imperatively demands that the proceedings in the court over which you are now presiding, having been pending more than four weeks, should be brought to a close without any unnecessary delay. You are, therefore, directed to sit without regard to hours, and close your proceedings as speedily as may be consistent with justice to the public service.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.