War of the Rebellion: Serial 017 Page 0895 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

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Question. If his answers and conversation with you during the whole interview were not only not rude, but polite and courteous, will you say in what there could have been any sneering according to your recollection?

Answer. By sneering, I refer to the manner.

Question. Can you describe the manner in words?

Answer. I do not know that I could describe it any better than to say that it was a sneering, indifferent manner and tone. As for the sneering, it was somewhat suppressed.

Question. Without having ever before seen him, and, of course, without knowing what his manner in conversation was habitually, how are you able to tell that his manner upon that occasion was not his usual manner?

Answer. I am able distinctly to tell, because that manner and tone were whenever he spoke of anything connected with this matter of the ammunition, and the matter of General Pope's conduct in leaving the wounded, &c.; it was when he spoke of those matters connected with General Pope.

Question. had you any conversation with him in relation to any other matters on that occasion?

Answer. Nothing more, as I remember, than the matter in regard to asking about the road. I dare say there was some other general conversation.

Question. You seem not to have understood the meaning of my question immediately preceding the last. I will repeat it: Without having ever before seen him, and, of course, without knowing what his manner in conversation was habitually, how are you able to tell that his manner upon that occasion was not his usual manner?

Answer. I thought I understood that question, and I have answered it. I would be glad to have my attention called to anything in that question that I have not answered.

Question. What the accused wants to know is, how it was possible for you, who never before had seen him or conversed with him until this occasion, to have known that his manner of conversation then was not his usual manner?

Answer. I presume his manner and conversation then, when he spoke of other matters than in regard to those connected with our moving back to Alexandria, and with regard to the care of the wounded at Kettle Run, was his usual manner: but I have no means of knowing whether or not it was his usual manner. There was nothing in that connection that showed the tone I spoke of. While this tone and manner that I speak of was more distinct in regard to these two point i have mentioned, I do not wish to be understood as saying that I did not receive the same continuous impression all through the conversation, after the remarks about the ammunition, in regard to the character of the man. Of course I cannot remember distinctly about that.

Question. Do you know what became of the ammunition that the had called for?

Answer. No, sir.

Question. Where did you leave it?

Answer. I sent it forward from the station on the railroad. Each drive, as he went forward, was instructed that that was for the corps of General Porter, I suppose. This station was just beyond a bridge over this run, I think [pointing to the map]. There was nor regular station there. The reason the ammunition was at the point I speak of was because the bridge there had been burned by the enemy, and we could get the ammunition no farther toward Manassas than that point. It was stopped, therefore, at the head of the ravine that led down to the bridge across that run, which, I think, was Kettle Run.