War of the Rebellion: Serial 017 Page 0855 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., December 8, 1862.

The court met pursuant to adjournment.

Present, Major General D. Hunter, U. S. Volunteers; Major General E. A. Hitchcock, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General Rufus King, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General B. M. Prentiss, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General James B. Ricketts, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General Silas Casey, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General James A. Garfield, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General N. B. Buford, U. S. Volunteers; Brigadier General J. P. Slough, U. S. Volunteers; and Colonel J. Holt, Judge-Advocate-General.

The accused, with his counsel, was also present.

The minutes of the last session were read and approved.

The accused asked permission to further examine the witness, Major-General Pope, upon some points he had omitted on Saturday last. Permission was accordingly granted.

The examination of Major General JOHN POPE was then resumed, as follows, by the accused:

Question. What is the distance between Gainesville and Jackson's right, as it stood at 4.30 p. m. of the 29th August?

Answer. I should think not to exceed 6 miles.

Question. At what hour, as reported by General Buford, did Longstreet pass through Gainesville on that day?

Answer. As I remember General Buford's dispatch-I have not seen it, or, rather, not read it since-I do not remember that he reported Longstreet to have passed through at all, but that he reported a certain portion of Longstreet's forces, which the designated to have passed through Gainesville, at what hour I do not now remember.

Question. How long time would it take for Longstreet's force, after leaving Gainesville, to reach that point of the road where the line of the march of the accused would strike the road from Manassas Junction to Gainesville?

Answer. That I cannot tell. As I understand, the road from Manassas Junction to Gainesville intersects the Warrenton turnpike east of Gainesville, perhaps a mile or two, though I have never myself been over the road.

Question. How long time would be required for the force of Longstreet, after leaving Gainesville, to reach the point where Jackson's right stood at 4.30 p. m. on that day?

Answer. Jackson's right, as I understood it to be, was about 5 or 6 miles east of Gainesville. I cannot tell how long it would take, because I do not know how fast Longstreet's troops marched. The court can judge of that as well as I can. I had not been over the road. It was a turnpike road, a macadamized road, worn in places east of that point where I passed over it. I had not myself been over it as far as Gainesville.

Question. Supposing, then, Longstreet's forces to have passed through Gainesville as early as 1 o'clock in the day, they would have had more than ample time to arrive on Jackson's right at 4.30 p. m.?

Answer. According to my opinion as to the capacity of troops for marching, they would have had more than time. But such is not my experience of the divisions of the army in Virginia.

Question. Is it not the general fact that the rebel army in Virginia, at this period of time, was understood usually to march with rapidity, and without much incumbrance in the was of trains or other causes?

Answer. I suppose that to be the popular belief. I do not know it to be the fact.

Question. At what time did the battle of the 29th of August begin,