War of the Rebellion: Serial 016 Page 0768 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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WINCHESTER, VA., September 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Simultaneously with your order, I received information that a column of 20,000 of the enemy are coming down the valley, and supposed to be now within 20 miles. I send cavalry out to make a reconnaissance. If true, I shall have little time to get Government property away. There are about 80,000 rations and a large amount of ammunition which must be destroyed, if rapid movement is necessary. There are sufficient guerrilla forces of the enemy at hand to immediately occupy the place. Shall I destroy the subsistence and ammunition, or endeavor to defend or move it?

Yours, &c.,

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, September, 2, 1862.

General JULIUS WHITE, Winchester:

The orders given you about the withdrawal of your forces were based on the supposition that the entire force of the enemy was now engaged with General Pope's army, near Fairfax Court-House, and that your would have plenty of time to remove everything. It is impossible, from the conflicting reports of the different generals as to the position of the enemy, to give special instructions. As a general rule, public property should be destroyed only when absolutely necessary. You must exercise your own discretion in this matter from the facts as you ascertain them; but don't be deceived by mere rumors. Take measures to ascertain facts, and act accordingly.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WINCHESTER, VA., September 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I leave Winchester to-night. The enemy is reported in some force in my front. I may have to go via Martinsburg; can reach Harper's Ferry easier by that route, and may have to go that way to do so safely.

Yours, &c.,

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WINCHESTER, VA., September 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

If expedition is necessary, I can make Martinsburg, and thence by rail to Harper's Ferry, quicker. It is 20 miles to Martinsburg, and 30 to Harper's Ferry.

Yours, &c.,

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HARPER'S FERRY, September 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I have the honor to report the arrival of my command at this post. I brought away all my artillery, except the 32-pounders, which would have consumed one entire day to remove. A large share of the ammunition, all camp equipage, &c., were saved. Some subsistence was destroyed, but not a large amount.

Yours, &c.,

JULIUS WHITE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Colonel THOMAS H. FORD called by the Government, and sworn and examined as follows:

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. What position have you in the military service?

Answer. I am colonel of the Thirty-second Regiment Ohio Volunteers.

Question. Were you at Winchester on the occasion of its late evacuation by General White?

Answer. Yes, sir.

Question. Will you describe the manner of that evacuation, in refer-