War of the Rebellion: Serial 016 Page 0717 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

Search Civil War Official Records

Casualties in Ewell's Division - Continued.

Command. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate

Battle of Ox

Hill,

September 1.

Lawton's

brigade:

13th Georgia 1 1 ---- 2

31st Georgia 1 3 ---- 4

38th Georgia 1 2 ---- 3

60th Georgia ---- 2 ---- 2

61st Georgia ---- 1 ---- 1

Early's

brigade:

13th Virginia 4 13 2 19

25th Virginia ---- 3 ---- 3

31st Virginia 1 7 ---- 8

52nd Virginia 1 1 ---- 2

Trimble's

brigade:

12th Georgia 1 1 ---- 2

21st Georgia 1 9 ---- 10

15th Alabama ---- 4 ---- 4

21st North ---- 4 ---- 4

Carolina

Courtney ---- 1 ---- 1

Artillery

Hays' brigade:

5th Louisiana 12 21 ---- 33

6th Louisiana 9 32 ---- 41

7th Louisiana 3 15 ---- 18

8th Louisiana 3 17 2 22

14th Louisiana 6 14 1 21

RECAPITULATION

FOR DIVISION.

Lawton's 3 9 ---- 12

brigade

Early's brigade 6 24 2 32

Trimble's 2 19 ---- 21

brigade

Hays' brigade 33 99 3 135

Total 44 151 5 200

Numbers 191. Report of Colonel Henry Forno, Fifth Louisiana Infantry, commanding Hays' Brigade, of operations August 26 - 29.

CAMP NEAR PORT ROYAL, VA., January 2, 1863.

GENERAL: Hays' brigade, under my command, arrived at Bristoe Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, at 6 p. m. August 26, 1862, and was ordered to attack and destroy the railroad trains then approaching the station, they being supposed to contain troops. The duty was promptly performed, and the brigade lay on their arms until daylight on the 27th, at which time I made a reconnaissance to the front in force, when, finding the enemy embarking their troops, attacked them with artillery. After doing some damage the enemy succeeded in getting their train off. I then returned, leaving the Sixth Louisiana Regiment (Colonel [H. B.] Strong on picket 2 miles in advance, the Eighth Louisiana Regiment (Major [T. B.] Lewis) 1 mile nearer the main line, with orders to Colonel Strong, should the enemy advance, to skirmish to the rear with the Eighth, who were directed to destroy the railroad bridges and as much of the track as possible; to retire in good order under cover of our artillery. This duty was performed to my entire satisfac-