War of the Rebellion: Serial 016 Page 0575 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

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One 3-inch rifle gun exploded during action. The batteries were engaged from about 7 to 11 a.m., and expended the following ammunition:

Rounds.

First Company Washington Artillery......................... 400

Section Dixie Artillery.................................... 299

Section Maurin's battery [Donaldsonville Artillery]........ 119

Stribling's battery........................................ 354

Leake's battery (one piece)................................ 10

_____

Total...................................................... 1,182

Captain Leake reported after the enemy had retired with one rifle and three smooth-bore guns. He sustained no loss.

About 2 p.m. Major Garnett rode up and requested me to send four rifle guns to Colonel S. D. Lee, who was on the right, near the Central Railroad, and for this purpose I detached Lieutenant Owen, with one section Washington Artillery and one section of Maurin's battery.

In obedience to your orders at 5.30 p.m. I ordered all the guns back to their respective commands.

Very respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

C. W. SQUIRES,

Captain, Commanding First Company Batt. Washington Artillery.

Colonel J. B. WALTON,

Chief of Artillery, Right Wing, Army of Northern Virginia.

No. 133. Report of Captain J. B. Richardson, Washington Artillery, of battle of Manassas.

BIVOUAC NEAR FREDERICK, MD., September 9, 1862.

SIR: In accordance with your order of this date I have the honor of making the following report:

On the morning of Saturday, August 30, I was ordered by Major J. J. Garnett forward from my position on the Manassas Gap Railroad to join your brigade, which was then in motion. I moved forward with my battery until arriving at the Chinn house, when I was informed that our infantry had charged and taken a battery near that position, but owing to heavy re-enforcements thrown forward by the enemy were unable to hold it without the assistance of a battery. I immediately went into position to the left of the house and commenced firing on the enemy; afterward, advancing some 400 yards, succeeded in holding the battery and turning it against the enemy, driving them back, together with the battery posted in our front, to the woods on our right, when they were pursued by the infantry.

I fired 178 rounds, and had Private Henry N. White killed, Privates A. R. Blakely, H. D. Simmons, and Douglas Ward wounded. First Lieutenant Samuel Hawes had his horse shot under him and behaved with great coolness, as did Lieuts. J. D. Britton and G. B. De Russy. My fired with great accuracy. I beg leave to mention Privates Cleveland and Davis, who were the first to reach the captured guns, and with the