War of the Rebellion: Serial 016 Page 0574 OPERATIONS IN N.VA., W.VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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Galbraith accomplished under a heavy fire, and was partly forced from his first position, when Lieutenant Landry, with a section of Captain Maurin's battery, reported, and was sent to assist Lieutenant Galbraith, the four guns being placed under Lieutenant Galbraith, who managed to keep a heavy enfilading fire from the main batteries by the coolness and bravery with which he maneuvered this battery. The fire on both sides now became general and rapid. The enemy placed more artillery in position, and for some time I thought I should have to retire; but the enemy soon slackened his fire, and it was evident he was worsted by the projectiles with which our artillerists assailed him. An officer now came from the right and informed me that the infantry were preparing to charge, and to cease firing as soon as they appeared. I kept up the fire, returning shot for show with the enemy, who appeared to be willing to give up the combat. Seeing this, and being informed that General Evans, commanding the infantry, was advancing to attack the enemy, I ordered the four reserve guns of Lieutenant Galbraith in position to engage the enemy's artillery and draw his attention while our troops were advancing. Our artillery now consisted of eight guns, viz, one section Washington Artillery and one section Maurin's battery, Lieutenant E. Owen, Washington Artillery, commanding; one section Washington Artillery and one section Dixie Artillery, Lieutenant Galbraith commanding. Captain Stribling had expended all his ammunition, and I ordered him from the field to replenish. The firing was now briskly renewed on both sides, which lasted for twenty minutes. The enemy finally gave up his position, retired across the Rappahannock, and only replied occasionally to our fire, and an hour after ceased firing altogether.

It is with pleasure I am enabled [to speak of] the gallantry with which Captain Stribling, officers, and men behaved on this occasion.

Lieutenant Chapman, with his section of the Dixie Artillery, behaved with great coolness and handled his guns with effect.

To Lieuts. E. Oven, J. M. Galbraith, and those under their command, I would especially call your attention. Both officers commanded full batteries, and handled them with the coolness, bravery, and good judgment which has so often on previous occasions won the confidence of their men.

Sergts. T. Y. Aby, C. L. C. Dupuy, and L. M. Montgomery rendered me efficient service. The latter on previous occasions has placed me under many obligations for his voluntary services.

Casualties:*

Killed. Wounded.

First Company Battalion Washington Artillery...... 4 5

Dixie Artillery [Chapman's battery]............... -- 4

Stribling's battery............................... -- 2

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Total............................................. 4 11

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Horses killed and wounded:

First Company Battalion Washington Artillery...... 1 1

Stribling's battery............................... 4 --

Dixie Artillery................................... 1 --

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Total............................................. 6 1

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*Nominal list omitted.

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