War of the Rebellion: Serial 016 Page 0363 Chapter XXIV. CAMPAIGN IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

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Numbers 10. WASHINGTON, October 17, 1862.

Colonel ROBERT C. BUCHANAN:

I inclose a printed copy of Brigadier-General Milroy's report of the battle of the 30th of August last, and beg to call your attention to that part of it where he speaks of asking me for re-enforcements, or the day would be lost, &c. I mark the portion to which I refer, as yours was the brigade which at this time was sent to re-enforce General Meade, the officer referred to by General Milroy, but whose name he does not give. I wish you would give me your recollection of the circumstances-

1st. As to the state of mind General Milroy seemed to be in, his manner, and the impression it produced at the time to which I refer.

2nd. As to whether or not it was a question of my sending re-enforcements to General Sigel and if I refused to do so.

3rd. As to the part taken by General Milroy with your brigade, which he claims to have led to where they were most needed, but from which they were forced back, &c.

Please return the report with your answer.

Very respectfully, &c.

IRVIN McDOWELL,

Major-General.

Numbers 11. WASHINGTON, October 20, 1862.

Major General IRVIN McDOWELL, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Your note [of October 17], inclosing a printed copy of General Milroy's report, is before me, and I will answer your questions seriatim.

1st. "As to the state of mind General Milroy seemed to be in, his manner, and the impression it produced at the time to which you refer;" that is, when he rode up and asked for re-enforcements.

Answer. General Milroy's manner was very excited, so much so as to attract the special attention of those present, and induced many to inquire "who that was rushing about so wildly, and what he wanted."

Second. "As to whether or not it was a question of my (your) sending re-enforcements to General Sigel, and if I (you) refused to do so?"

Answer. General Sigel's name or corps was not referred to in any way in my hearing, as far as I recollect.

Third. "As so the part taken by General Milroy with your (my) brigade, which he claims to have led to where they were most needed, but from which, they were forced back, " &c.

Answer. When re-enforcements were called for to go to the assistance of General Meade I was ordered by General Sykes to take three of my battalions and move up to the front and left to the point most threatened, which I did at once. I left General Milroy haranguing and gesticulating most emphatically in the same place where his conversation with you commenced. He was calling for re-enforcements, saying that "if they were sent at once the days would be ours and that the enemy were ready to run." After I placed my three battalions in position I moved to the right of my line, when, to my surprise, I saw about 100 yards to