War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0718 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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Return of Casualties in the Confederate forces at the battle of Cross Keys, &c. - Continued.

Killed Wounded

Command Offi-cers Enlis-ted Total Offi-cers Enlis-ted men Total

men

Artillery

(batteries)

Brocken-brough's

..... 2 2 ..... ..... .....

Courtney's ..... 2 2 ..... 10 10

Lusk's ..... 2 2 ..... 3 3

Raine's ..... 2 2 ..... 7 7

Rice's ..... ..... ...... ..... ..... .....

Total 14 103 117 50 705 755

Cavalry

2nd ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

Virginia

6th .....

Virginia ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

Chew's ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....

battery

Grand total 16 117 134 60 865 925

Missing

Command Officers Enlisted Total Aggrega-te Remarks

men

Artillery

(batteries)

Brocken-brough's

..... ..... ..... 2

Courtney's ..... ..... ..... 12

Lusk's ..... ..... ..... 5

Raine's ..... 8 8 17

Rice's ..... ..... ..... ..... No

report

Total 1 18 19 891

Cavalry

No

2nd ..... ..... ..... ..... report

Virginia

6th No

Virginia ..... ..... ..... ..... report

Chew's No

battery ..... ..... ..... ..... report

Grand total 1 50 51 1.109

Numbers 61. Report of Captain J. K. Boswell, C. S. Army, Chief Engineer, of operations June 1 - 9.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

March 27, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I rejoined you at Strasburg on the evening of May 31, 1862, having just returned from Richmond, whither I had gone on [the] 26th as bearer of dispatches to General J. E. Johnston.

On the morning of June 1 I was directed by you to make a reconnaissance down the Front Royal road to gain information with regard to the movements of the enemy and to find out whether the pickets were properly posted. I took with me a lieutenant and 5 men, and crossed the North River just below the railroad bridge, but had not gone more than a hundred yards before I came in sight of a considerable body of the enemy's cavalry a short distance in front. Seeing that it would be needless to attempt to fight them I recrossed the river as rapidly as possible, and, leaving the cavalry as a picket on the road, returned to headquarters to inform you of the advance of the enemy's cavalry in that direction, and not being able to find you I gave the information to General Ashby, who immediately sent a portion of his command to guard that road. During the retreat from Strasburg to New Market I was engaged, as were Mr. Hotchkiss and Mr. Brown, topographical engineers, in transmitting orders and keeping the wagon train in motion.

On the 4th I took with me Mr. Brown, and went by your order to Mr. Crawford to see if a bridge could be built over the North River. On reaching there I found Captain Mason, acting quartermaster, and Lieutenant W. G. Turpin, Engineers. After examining the river we determined that it would be impossible to build a bridge, as the river was