War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0663 Chapter XXIV. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY.

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of you to stand cautiously on the defensive; get your force in order, and give such protection as you can to the valley of the Shenandoah and to Western Virginia.

Have you received the orders and will you act upon them?

A. LINCOLN.

MOUNT JACKSON, June 16, 1862, (Received 5.30 p. m.)

Your dispatch of to-day is received. In reply to that part of it which concerns the orders sent to me I have to say that they have been received, and that as a matter of course I will act upon them, as I am now doing.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

The PRESIDENT.

WASHINGTON, June 17, 1862.

Major-General FREMONT,

Mount Jackson:

It is reported here that you understand the President's order to you as requiring you to remain at Mount Jackson. The President directs me to say that he does wish you to hold your position at Mount Jackson if you can safely do so; but if pressed beyond your strength that you will then fall back toward Strasburg for support from General Banks. General Banks is now here, and will see you immediately upon his return to his command.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, June 17, 1862.

Ordered, That the military protection and defense of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad east of Cumberland to the city of Baltimore, and of the railroad between Harper's Ferry and Winchester, is especially assigned to the command of Major General John E. Wool. Officers on the line of that road will report to him.

2nd. That the Winchester and Potomac Railroad being the line of supply for General Banks, operating the road will remain under his direction.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS, Mount Jackson, June 17, 1862.

Both your telegrams of this date, including the order assigning railroads, received.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.