War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0656 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA.,AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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gallantry displayed by Colonel Cluseret on this and frequent former occasions during the pursuit in which we have been engaged deserve high praise.

Respectfully,

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS, Port Republic, June 10, 1862.

The officer sent with a detachment of cavalry to open communication with General Shields returned at 3 o'clock this morning, having found the troops on the march under orders for Richmond. He learns from the adjutant-general of General Shields that the Union Forces engaged yesterday were only three brigades, which were almost cut to pieces. Jackson having received re-enforcements, General Shields having been ordered to Richmond with his force, and my own being very much weakened by battle and the hardships and exposures of a severe march, I deem it best to fall back until I can form a junction with the forces of Generals Banks and Sigel and am made acquainted with your wishes.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DIVISION, Harrisonburg, June 11, 1862. (Received June 12, 10 a. m.)

Your dispatch of yesterday morning finds me here withdrawing upon Mount Jackson, a strong, defensible position behind the Shenandoah, and the key to the surrounding country. General Shields' withdrawal after his action of the 9th, together with the condition of my troops made this movement imperative. Will you allow me to halt at Mount Jackson instead of Harrisonburg, which is not a line of defense, and exposed me to be cut off from my supplies and communication? My troops are much distressed for want of supplies, which are far in the rear and come up very inadequately. We are greatly in need of surgeons and ambulances.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States.

HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD, Mount Jackson, June 12, 1862. (Received June 13, 10 a. m.)

Upon intelligence of General Shields' defeat and withdrawal toward Richmond I retired upon this place, which is a defensible and good position. The regiments composing my command have been rendered very weak by illness, casualties, and deaths. I request that orders be given to recruit them to full strength immediately. Their condition