War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0652 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA.,AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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ceeded in burning several, the most important of which was that over the Shenandoah at this place. Our loss to-day is but 1 killed. We have begun to release prisoners taken at Front Royal, about 30 having been recaptured to-day. The late violent rains, which still continue, have raised the rivers so that they are not fordable, but arrangements are being made to-night for crossing, and the pursuit will be continued early in the morning. I hope to-morrow to force the rebels to a stand.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Mountain Department, June 4, 1862. (Received June 6, 1.05 p. m.)

It has rained continuously and hard for twenty-four hours, producing one of the two greatest freshets known for many years. The Shenandoah rose 10 feet in four hours, breaking up the temporary bridge just thrown across. The bridge at Edenburg, partially demolished by the enemy, is also now entirely swept away. A regiment of infantry and two companies of cavalry succeeded in crossing the Shenandoah before the bridge was broken, and are now encamped on the other side of the stream. The effort to cross will be renewed to-morrow morning. The prisoners now number 400. We hear nothing yet of General Shields.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

HDQRS. MOUNTAIN DEPT., ARMY IN THE FIELD, Harrisonburg, June 7, 1862. (Received June 9, 9 a. m.)

The army reached this place at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, driving out the enemy's rear guard from the town. Severe skirmishing continued from that time until dark, the enemy's rear being closely pressed by our advance. At 4 o'clock the First New Jersey Cavalry, after driving the enemy through the village, fell into an ambuscade in the woods to the southeast of the town, in which Colonel Wyndham, of that regiment, was captured and considerable loss sustained. Colonel Cluseret with his brigade subsequently engaged the enemy in the timber, driving him from his position and taking his camp. At about 8 a battalion of Colonel Kane's (Pennsylvania) regiment entered the woods under the direction of Brigadier-General Bayard, and maintained for half an hour a vigorous attack, in which both sides suffered severely, driving the enemy. The enemy attempted to shell our troops, but a few shots from one of our batteries soon silenced his guns. After dark the enemy continued his retreat. Full particulars will be forwarded by mail. The condition of the force is extremely bad, for want of supplies. We have been obliged to leave our single pontoon train at one of the bridges behind, in order to get our supplies over, and are now without any.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.