War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0503 Chapter XXIV. ACTIONS AT WOLF CREEK, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

MAY 15-17, 1862.-Actions at Wolf Creek and Princeton, W. Va.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1.-Major General John C. Fremont, U. S. Army, commanding the Mountain Department.

Numbers 2.-Brigadier General Jacob D. Cox, U. S. Army, commanding District of the Kanawha.

Numbers 3.-Colonel E. Parker Scammon, Twenty-third Ohio Infantry, commanding First Provisional Brigade.

Numbers 4.-Colonel Augustus Moor, Twenty-eighth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Provisional Brigade.

Numbers 5.-Lieutenant Colonel Louis von Blessingh, Thirty-seventh Ohio Infantry.

Numbers 6.-Brigadier General Henry Heth, C. S. Army.

Numbers 7.-Brigadier General Humphrey Marshall, C. S. Army.

Numbers 1. Reports of Major General John C. Fremont, U. S. Army, commanding the Mountain Department.

FARMINGTON [FRANKLIN], May 18, 1862.

I am officially informed that General Cox, with the Twenty-eighth and parts of the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-seventh Ohio, attacked the rebels yesterday morning, routed and drove them from Princeton, which they had taken the evening before, capturing from 15 to 20. I am further officially informed that General Heth had fallen back from Lewisburg to Jackson's river Depot, there built boats, and took his stores down to Buchanan, and is now moving them to Bonsack's Station, on the Tennessee Railroad, his forces meanwhile going to Newbern. I still think that any available troops should be sent without delay to Point Pleasant, to sustain General Cox. Please notify me to-day whether these troops will be sent, so that I may know upon what to rely.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

FRANKLIN, VA., May 18, 1862.

Since Numbers 18 I have report of General Cox. He says:

We had sharp fight with the enemy at all points yesterday, and inflicted serious damage on him. We lost 3 killed and several wounded. The assault at this post spread the alarm up the line so as to delay our trains and make our supplies short, losing some destroyed in the town.

J. D. COX.

The strength of the enemy is such that if General Cox concentrates to attack them they can fall upon his line of communication from either side. He needs re-enforcements now to enable him to attack. After the enemy is re-enforced by General Heth he would be enabled to hold his position without aid.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.