War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0456 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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MAY 6, 1862-Skirmish near Harrisonburg, Va.

Report of Major General Nathaniel P. Banks, U. S. Army, and congratulations from Secretary of War.

NEW MARKET, May 7, 1862.

The Fifth New York Cavalry had a sharp skirmish with Ashby's cavalry yesterday near Harrisonburg. They made a succession of most spirited charges against superior numbers, killing 10, wounding many, and capturing 6 rebels. Their conduct gave the highest satisfaction. Their chief weapon was the saber. The enemy does not show himself except by cavalry. We shall make most vigorous efforts to discover his position. His chief object will doubtless be to prevent a junction of forces on this line with General McDowell.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 8, 1862.

Major General N. P. BANKS, New Market, Va.:

Your account of the repulse of Ashby's cavalry yesterday is received. The New York Fifth Cavalry, by their bravery in the skirmish and the promptness and spirit with they improved the advantage they gained over the enemy by pursuing and cutting them up, merits praise.

The enemy on the Peninsula have evacuated Williamsburg and continue retiring, but where they intend the next making the next stand is not yet ascertained.

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

MAY 7, 1862.-Skirmish at and near Wardensville, W. Va.

REPORTS.

No. 1.-Major General John C. Fremont, U. S. Army.

No. 2.-Lieutenant Colonel Stephen W. Downey, Third Maryland Potomac Home Brigade Infantry.

No. 1. Report of Major General John C. Fremont, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD,

Franklin, May 20, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel Downey, sent to Wardensville after the party of guerrillas who murdered a party of officers, zouaves, and convalescent soldiers on their way from Winchester to Moorefield, reports that he killed Captain John Umbaugh, chief of guerrillas, and 3 of his men, wounded 5, and took 12 prisoners, without losing any of his command.

J. C. FREMONT,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.