War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0446 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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tect the two important bridges that cross the river. We were within sight of Luray. At the south bridge a sharp skirmish occurred with the rebels, in which they lost several men taken prisoners. Their object was the destruction of the bridges. One of the prisoners left the camp on the Rappahannock Tuesday morning. The enemy is at Rappahannock Station, commanded by General Elzey, formerly of U. S. Army; consists of four brigades, five regiments each. No fortifications to that time. Other reports indicate stronger force at Gordonsville and a contest there. The whole resulting in a belief that they are concentrating at Yorktown. I believe Jackson left this valley yesterday. He is reported to have left Harrisonburg yesterday for Gordonsville by the Mountain road. He camped last night at McGaheysville, 11 miles from Harrisonburg. The failure of our supplies made it impossible to continue the pursuit farther.

N. P. BANKS.

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

NEW MARKET, April 20, 1862.

The flight of Jackson from the valley, by the way of the mountains, from Harrisonburg toward Stanardsville and Orange Court-House, on Gordonsville is confirmed this morning by our scouts and prisoners.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

NEW MARKET, April 22, 1862.

Our advance is near Harrisonburg. We have troops across the mountains protecting the bridges on the Shenandoah at Alma and on the Luray road. To-day we pushed a force forward to Luray. The people were greatly alarmed at first on account of the reports circulated by the rebels as to the treatment they would receive from us, but in a few hours they became quite reconciled to the presence of the troops. There is a good road to Warrenton, 25 miles, and a turnpike to Culpeper Court-House, same distance. Some sharp skirmishes with the enemy. We lost 3 men prisoners. Jackson has abandoned the valley of Virginia permanently, en route for Gordonsville, by the way of the mountains. The crippled condition of our supplies alone enabled him to escape. When we halted our troops had not a ration left. We are now getting in good condition. Every day brings its prisoners and numerous deserters.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

NEW MARKET, April 24, 1862.

Our advance guard, Colonel Donnelly commanding, took 3 prisoners to-day at a point 9 miles beyond Harrisonburg. One says he belongs