War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0368 Chapter XXIV. OPERATIONS IN N. VA, W. VA., AND MD.

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Numbers 14. Report of Colonel Samuel S. Carroll, Eight Ohio Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHT OHIO INFANTRY,

Camp at Strasburg, March 26, 1862.

SIR: In accordance with instructions from your headquarters I have the honor to make the following report, viz:

On the 23rd instant, about 10.30 a. m., I received orders from brigade headquarters to move my regiment forward from camp near Winchester, as skirmishers, on either side of the turnpike toward Newton and feel the way. Immediately I marched the regiment out, and when about halt a mile from camp detachment Lieutenant-Colonel Sawyer, with Companies B, H, on the right of the pike; I took Companies F, K, A, and G on the left. Both wings deployed as skirmishers. Companies C and F were on picket duty on the right of the road, and joined Colonel Sawyer's command soon after it deployed. Company I was on picket near Winchester, and remained there. About the time we deployed, the rebels opened one battery on us. We kept advancing, and the battery fell back to the woods ahead of us and reopened their fire. When about 2 miles from our camp my wing came upon a body of the rebel infantry of five full companies, with a reserve of about 100 cavalry. They were masked behind a stone wall at the edge of a wood, and opened on us about 50 yards distant. My wing replied briskly, and, moving forward, routed them in fifteen or twenty minutes.

We kept-on advancing and driving them before us for three-quarters of a mile, when, finding that we were entire unsupported, I halted my wing. In the mean time Company B had joined us, and Colonel Sawyer's command gotten so far off to the right as to be out of sight.

So soon as I saw support coming I moved forward until the shells from our own batteries fell immediately in front of us, when I halted, not thinking it prudent to expose my men to the fire of our own as well as the rebel batteries. We remained nearly in that position during the remained of the day and battery on our extreme left flank. I detached one company to deter them, and they were charged upon by about 125 of the rebel cavalry, led by Colonel Ashby. I sent two more companies to their support, and they drove the enemy back and prevented their moving the battery on our flank.

On the morning of the 24th, before daylight, all my regiment joined me except Company I, and Colonel Sullivan ordered me to move forward and support a battery that he wished to get in an advanced position. We did so, and after moving forward there-quarters of a mile the battery finally halted, and I moved forward and continued in the advance until halted by your orders this side of Newtown.

Our loss in the engagement of the morning of the 23rd was 2 killed and 9 wounded. The loss of the enemy, killed and wounded, could not have been less that 50, mostly infantry. We had 1 wounded and 2 taken prisoners in the engagement in the afternoon The enemy left 7 killed and wounded on the field and 5 dead horses, and took away several wounded with them.

Inclosed is Colonel Sawyer's report of the loss in his command.