War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0229 Chapter XXIV. GENERAL REPORTS.

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5. General Wadsworth's report of April 2 gives his force as follows:

Infantry.................................................. 15,335

Artillery................................................. 4,294

Cavalry (six companies only mounted)...................... 848

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20,477

Deduct sick, in arrest, and confinement................... 1,455

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Total for duty............................................ 19,022

From this force General Wadsworth is directed to detach two good regiments from Richardson's division (Sumner's corps), which should be deducted from his command; one regiment to replace the Thirty-seventh New York in Heintzelman's old division, and one regiment to relieve a regiment of Hooker's division at Budd's Ferry; total, four regiments. He is also ordered to send 4,000 men to relieve Sumner at Manassas and Warrenton.

General Wadsworth represents that he has no mounted light artillery under his command; states there are several companies of reserve artillery still here, but not under his command or fit for service.

General Wadsworth further reports that nearly all the force is new and imperfectly disciplined; that several of the regiments are in a very disorganized condition, some of them having been relieved from brigades which have gone into the field in consequence of their unfitness for service, the best regiments remaining having been selected to take their places. Two heavy artillery regiments and one infantry regiment which had been drilled for months in artillery service having been withdrawn from the forts on the south side of the Potomac and their places supplied with new infantry regiments entirely unacquainted with the duties of that army and of little or no value in their present position.

If there was need of a military force for the safety of the city of Washington within its own limits that referred to in the report of General Wadsworth would seem to be entirely inadequate.

In view of the opinion expressed by the council of the commanders of army corps of the force necessary for the defense of the capital, though not numerically stated, and of the force represented by General McClellan as left for that purpose, we are of opinion that the requirements of the President that this city shall be left "entirely secure," not only in the opinion of the General-in-Chief, but that of the "commanders of the army corps" also, has not been fully complied with.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

E. A. HITCHCOCK.

Major-General Volunteers, U. S. Army.

M.

Copy of a paper handed to the President by General Hitchcock.

MARCH 30, 1862.

The main line of the enemy extends from Richmond through Chattanooga and Corinth to Memphis, and at Corinth there is a connection South.

General Halleck (at Saint Louis) is acting upon the west of this line, with General Buell as his immediate commander, having Corinth in view as one object and some point at or near the Cumberland Gap as another object.