War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0196 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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APPENDIX.

A.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA,

Manassas Junction, August 28, 1862-1.20 p. m. [4.15 p. m.

Major-General MCDOWELL:

I sent you a dispatch few minutes ago directing you to move on Gum Spring to intercept Jackson. Since them i have received your note of this morning. I will this evening push forward Reno to Gainesville and follow with Heintzelman, unless there is a large force of the enemy at Centreville, which I do not believe. ascertain, if you can, about this. I do not wish you to carry out the order to proceed to Gum Spring if you consider it too hazardous, but I will support you in any way you suggest, by pushing forward form Manassas Junction across the turnpike. Jackson has a large train, which should certainly be captured. Give me your views fully; you know the country much better the I do. Come no farther in this direction with your command, but call back what has advanced thus far.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

B.

HEADQUARTER,

Manassas Junction, August 28, 1862. [4.15 p. m.]

Major-General MCDOWELL:

The enemy is reported in force on the other side of the Bull Run, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, as also near Centreville.

I have ordered Sigel to march upon Centreville immediately, as also Kearny and ReNumbers I will advance Hooker as reserve. Please march immediately with your command directly upon Centreville from where you are.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

C.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA,

Centreville, August 29, 1862.

Generals MCDOWELL and PORTER:

You will please move forward with your joint command toward Gainesville. I sent General Porter written orders to that effect an hour and a half ago. Heintzelman, Sigel, and Reno are moving on the Warrenton turnpike, and must now be not far from Gainesville. I desire that as soon as communication is established between this force and your own the whole command shall halt. It may be necessary to fall back behind Bull Run at Centreville to-night. I presume it will description to Ricketts, and none to interfere in any way with the movements of McDowell's troops except what I sent by his aide-de-camp last night, which were to hold his position on the Warrenton pike until the troops from here should fall on the enemy's flank and rear. I do not even know Rickett's position, as I have not been able to find out where General McDowell was until a late hour this morning.