War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0114 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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habits with respect to the use of intoxicating liquors, and whether you know of the reputation he bears as to the use of intoxicating liquors with those who are intimate with him. If so, state what his habits are or what they are reputed to be in this particular.

Answer. I never knew him to drink anything but water. I believe it is notorious in the Army that he does not drink anything but water.

Question by General MCDOWELL. Do you recollect if General McDowell did not write or telegraph you to discourage the coming of traders to Fredericksburg at the time his headquarters were opposite that place?

Answer. I recollect of receiving a communication of that sort from him.

Question by the COURT. Can you state the reasons and causes for the detention of General McDowell form the Army of the Potomac, together with his corps, and the consolidation of that corps with the troops left for the defense of Washington under his command?

Answer. I can give my impression. Because the troops left for the defense of Washington were not deemed adequate.

Question by the COURT. Can you state at what points the 19,400 men named by you were located when General McClellan embarked for the Peninsula; especially was this force or not wholly in the fortifications or did it include andy movable force?

Answer. The force employed in provost-guard duty was about 3,500 men. I think there was about as many more that were movable; not located in the forts, but ready for duty wherever they might be required. Some of these troops which I reported as movable were two regiments of cavalry, without horses or arms except sabers.

Question by the COURT. Where was the movable force to cover the city of Washington located?

Answer. I have stated all that was under my command and of which I have any direct knowledge. I understood that General Abercrombie was at Warrenton or Catlett's with a brigade of infantry and some cavalry. Two regiments form that brigade shortly after came in here to be paid off, their term of service having expired. General Banks was at Winchester, the other side of the Blue Ridge, and about 80 miles from here; but I cannot think his force was intended to cover Washington. I know of no other troops in any way connected with the defenses of Washington or available for its defense.

Question by the COURT. When you were left in command of the defenses of the city were you furnished with statements showing the location of the troops confided to your command? To what means did you resort to ascertain the number and location of the troops?

Answer. I have stated all that was under my command and of which I have any direct knowledge. I understood that General Abercrombie was at Warrenton or Catlett's with a brigade of infantry and some cavalry. Two regiments from that brigade shortly after came in here to be paid off, their term of service having expired. General Banks was at Winchester, the other side of the Blue Ridge, and about 80 miles from here; but I cannot think his force was intended to cover Washington. I know of no other troops in any way connected with the defenses of Washington or available for its defense.

Question by the COURT. When you were left in command of the defenses of the city were you furnished with statements showing the location of the troops confided to your command? To what means did you resort to ascertain the number and location of the troops?

Answer. I was not furnished with an accurate list. I took the command just as the troops were leaving for the Peninsula. I published an order for the commanders of all troops within my command to report to me.

Question by the COURT. State whether you consider the troops at Centreville, Manassas, in the valley of the Shenandoah, at Baltimore, or elsewhere in the department then commanded by Major-General Dix as being part of the forces designed for or properly applicable to the defense of Washington?

Answer. I should consider troops at Centreville and Manassas as covering Washington, but not troops the other side of Bull Run Mountains or at Baltimore or elsewhere in the department of General Dix. I understood that there were very few troops at Baltimore, not more than was required for the police duty and safety of the place. I ought to add, perhaps, that I had a communication form General McClellan indicating that my right would rest on General Banks' left at Manassas. I, however, received the subsequent order to send 4,000 troops to Manassas.

Question by the COURT. How many troops did General Abercrombie