War of the Rebellion: Serial 015 Page 0094 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., AND MD. Chapter XXIV.

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15. Dated War Department, May 24, 1862, from Abraham Lincoln to General McDowell.

16. (Same), May 24, 1862, from General McDowell to the President.

17. War Department, May 24, 1862, from Abraham Lincoln to General McDowell.

18. Dated Headquarters Department of the Rappahannock, May 24, 1862, from General McDowell to His Excellency the President.

The examination of Major-General McClellan was resumed.

A book was here handed the witness containing telegrams, and the telegrams referred to in the following questions are appended to the proceedings of this day and marked to the proceedings of this day and marked Alpha and Beta.

Question by General McDOWELL. Examine the telegrams, pages 252 and 266 and dated June 10 and June 12, and state if you received them.

Answer. I received them.

Question by General McDOWELL. Did you also receive the telegram of May 22, 1862, which has been read to the court?

Answer. Yes.

Question by General McDOWELL. Did you frequently and daily see General McDowell when he was at Fairfax Court-House in March last past, and did you see him on the day the troops were ordered back to Alexandria? If so, state what was his condition at that time or at any time he was at Fairfax Court-House when the army was there in March last, as to his being or not under the influence of intoxicating liquor. How long have you know General McDowell; and have the habits of General McDowell, as to the use of, or abstinence from, every species of distilled vinous or fermented liquors been a subject of remark among those who know him? If, so, what has been his habit or is the general character borne by him in this regard?

Answer. I saw General McDowell several times every day in March last at Fairfax Court-House and also on the day the troops were ordered back to Alexandria. He was in his usual condition, entirely free from any effect of intoxicating liquors. I have known General McDowell for nearly twenty years, and have known him as one who abstained entirely from the use of any wine or spirituous liquors, and I think even from tea and coffee. I know that has been his reputation among all who have known him, and I can imagine nothing more absurd than the charge of his being in any way under the influence of intoxicating liquor.

Question by the COURT. State whether General McDowell was under your command at the time of your movement from the Potomac to the Peninsula.

Answer. He was.

Question by the COURT. What orders were given by you to General McDowell having reference to the movement to the Peninsula and now did those orders affect the general plan of movements for the Army of the Potomac?

Answer. The orders were for General McDowell to embark his corps upon the return of the transports them engaged in carrying troops, and having his whole command embarked to report to me for further orders at Fort Monroe or wherever else I might happen to be, the intention being to move that corps as a until by the York or Severe River, according to circumstances; that movement being an essential part of the plan of the campaign.

Question by the COURT. Were these orders ever changed by you or by others higher in authority; and, if so, how?

Answer. They were not changed by me, but by the President of the United States. When ion front of Yorktown, with a considerable portion of their army under fire, I received the first intimation to change the destination of General McDowell's corps. That intimation was a telegraphic dispatch from the War Department, informing me that General McDowell's corps had been withdrawn from the Army of the Potomac.