War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0689 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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IN THE FIELD, June 27, 1862

General PENDLETON:

SIR: I am instructed by General Magruder to say to you that great assistance can be given our friends by placing "Long Tom" and all longrange pieces you have in the rear of Mrs. Christian's. Great execution could have been done yesterday evening if pieces had been stationed there. If the enemy falls back he will retire by Sydner's, upon which place you will have good range. If Colonel Davis' cavalry (spoken of in the order) is anywhere near you, please inform them that there is no support for the artillery at Mrs. Christian's, and it would be well for them to take post there.

I am, sir, very respectfully, &c.,

A. G. DICKINSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT WING,

June 28, 1862

General PENDLETON:

SIR: I am instructed by Major-General Magruder to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this morning, and to say that he entirely approves of your plans of disposing of the heavy guns to counter-batter the enemy's batteries and works, and has for some time desired to put up earthworks in Garnett's fields, which would place our artillery on an equal footing with the enemy's. Major Stevens, chief engineers, was opposed to this, and General Magruder, having no engineer under his command, could not overcome to obstacles which were interposed to his erecting these works, and the working tools are now removed to some point in the rear in consequence of General Lee's orders.

If you will get the President or Secretary of War to assign an engineer to General Magruder, and ascertain where the tools taken by the engineers are, General Magruder will take the tools and endeavor to make some protection to our artillery bearing on the enemy's works in our front.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY BRYAN

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION

DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

July 2, 1862

General PENDLETON, Commanding Artillery:

DEAR GENERAL: I am just in from night's battle-field, and left General Lee at 12 o'clock last night. We suffered severe loss in artillery horses in Lee's artillery, Magruder's command. The general directed me to send out artillery horses to-day, but I deem it best to advise you of the state of things, and suggest respectfully if it would not be better to send up fresh artillery to relieve Colonel Lee's companies that [suffered] so much yesterday, until they can draw new horses and refit. If I send a lot of unbroken horses over the crowded roads to hunt a division in our army at present, it will be nine to one if they reach their destination in two days.

I would further remark that General Longstreet ordered up last

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