War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0686 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN. Chapter XXIII.

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to learn that partial paralysis has already, commenced. The case is critical and the danger imminent. I will add a line in a few moments in reference to general condition of affairs

I am, general, with high regard, your most obedient servant,

JASPER S. WHITING,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General, Acting Engineer.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT WING,

Thorne's, June 12, 1862

General PENDLETON:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose the report of the number of guns under Colonel Lee's command now in position, and Colonel Cabell has been ordered to relieve them. He has only ten guns to relieve twelve. Of these, two are 32-pounders, two 12-pounder howitzers, two are 24-pounder howitzers, and four are 6-pounder guns. Colonel Cabell hopes you will forward, as soon as practicable, as many guns as you can spare, the guns removed being so much superior in caliber, &c., to the guns he is to put in position.

By order of Colonel Cabell.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHARD M. VENABLE,

Adjutant

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

June 21, 1862

Brigadier-General PENDLETON,

Commanding Artillery:

GENERAL: General Lee directs me to say that he is much obliged to you for your letter of this evening, just received.

General Huger may want more field artillery to hold his front, and General Lee requests that you will see that it is supplied, should his supposition be correct. General Lee desires you also to have all your reserve artillery parked on the different fronts, where it can be conveniently and rapidly brought into action when necessary. He will rely greatly upon the good use of artillery to hold the enemy in check should he advance against our weakened lines, and he requests that you will give your constant and unremitting attention to this matter.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. P. MASON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL MAGRUDER'S HEADQUARTERS

June 23, 1862.

General PENDLETON:

GENERAL: I think so far as the number of pieces is concerned there is sufficient, but several of the batteries are not efficient: for instance, Page's, Young's, and W. Jones' batteries together constitute but one battery of six pieces. Page has not sufficient men to man his guns (three pieces). Richardson has two 32-pounder guns, not suited for field service. Jordan's battery has three 32-pounder howitzers and one 12-pounder gun. The above-mentioned batteries, with Moody's and Read's,