War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0622 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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cause the troops in your advance to push forward (in accordance with previous orders) and drive in the enemy's pickets at once, and to push forward as far as can be carried consistently with the safety of your lines.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. G. DICKINSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-Similar instructions given Generals Jones and Griffith.

PETERSBURG, VA., June 27, 1862-4 p. m.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH:

The enemy have shelled out all my signal stations on the Appomattox River below Clifton. The obstructions-eleven gunboats, two iron-clads, the Monitor and Galena-are now in the Appomattox, and have full control of the river up to Port Walthall. Two small gunboats are in the Appomattox channel off Port Walthall. No transports are with them. A party of about 100 landed at Hodges', Prince George side, in small boats from the steamers. No landing up to this hour on the Chesterfield side. They, the enemy, are evidently feeling their way up toward our obstructions. I have reported up to 1 p. m. by vedette to General Holmes.

Your obedient servant,

J. F. MILLIGAN,

Captain and Signal Officer, Department of the Appomattox.

HEADQUARTERS, June 27, 1862.

His Excellency President DAVIS:

Mr. PRESIDENT: Profoundly grateful to Almighty God for the signal victory granted to us, it is my pleasing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning drive from his strong position behind Beaver Dam Creek and pursued to that behind Powhite Creek, and finally, after a severe contest of five hours, entirely repulsed from the field. Night put an end to the contest. I grieve to state that our loss in officers and men is great. We sleep on the field, and shall renew the contest in the morning.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

R. E. LEE,

General.

[FRIDAY MORNING, June 27, 1862.]

General BRANCH:

General Gregg has been ordered to cross Beaver Creek. As soon as you see any movements on the right or left or hear heavy musket firing, advance also and storm the creek.

A. P. HILL,

Major-General.