War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0486 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN,VA. Chapter XXIII.

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James River below Richmond, and a good constructing engineer is wanted. If Captain John R. Clarke, of the Provisional Engineer Corps, can be spared, and a portion of your negro force with him, please send them at once to Richmond to report to the Engineer Bureau for duty.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS, Lee's House, May 1, 1862.

General HILL:

GENERAL: I have just seen a note from General Whiting to General G. W. Smith, in which he says that you expect your wagons to start near sunset to-morrow. This would be much too late. My intention is, and instructions to all the major-generals, that the wagons shall reach the neighborhood of Williamsburg before dark. As the roads are bad, to accomplish this they must start early in the day. Please, therefore, to have yours set off as early in the day as you can. They cannot be driven over the road in the dark, and, if they could, would interfere with the march of the troops. It is absolutely necessary, therefore, not to delay.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

The chief quartermaster will assign the wagons their ground at the end of the march. Your quartermasters should accompany them, with orders to permit no teamster to stop in the road to water or for any other purpose. This is necessary to prevent delay. These quartermasters should show the troops their ground when they come up.

J. E. J.

HEADQUARTERS, Lee's House, May 1, 1862.

Major-General HILL:

GENERAL: Your letter of this morning is just received.*

You may retain the negroes for the work you mention upon the condition you state, that the places is one of perfect safety. Have the work pressed to immediate completion.

Have you any sick? If so, they must be sent to Richmond immediately. The time for the measure we spoke of at Longstreet's tent is very near. It is postponed only until the different divisions are ready. I am continually finding something in the way never mentioned to me before.

Could the troops at Gloucester Point join you? The move must be made by you, when the tie comes, in the early part of the night. Could Colonel Crump join, or will it be necessary for him to take another route?

Respectfully and truly, yours,

J. E. JOHNSTON.

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*Not found.

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