War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0311 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., July 10, 1862

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN.

Commanding Department of Virginia:

GENERAL: I have sent a flag of truce to City Point with Lieutenant Thorbora, with two of our own paroled officers whose time expires to-night, and who reported to me at the last moment, and some political prisoners whom I have discharged under a stringent parole, as authorized by you.

I would have ordered Lieutenant Darling, of the Second Artillery, who goes with them, to report to you, but I supposed he could not avail himself of the protection of the flag up and down the river if he did not confine himself strictly to the purpose of which it is sent.

The 13-inch mortars have all been brought here from Yorktown; the 100 and 200 pound Parrott guns left there yesterday for this post. All the guns ordered removed by you have been sent here. The guns at Gloucester have been destroyed, as it was found exceedingly difficult to remove them. The guns remaining at Yorktown are fifty-four in number, chiefly of Richmond manufacture. Captain Gibson, of the Third Artillery, has been engaged very efficiently in aiding General Van Alen to make arrangements for the defense or evacuation of the place, as the exigencies of the service may require.

I am sorry to report that Lieutenant Bayley and nine men of the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, imprudently sent off in the direction of Richmond from Matthews County, were captured and the former wounded. I shall ascertain who is responsible for this imprudence.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., July 10, 1862

General S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

GENERAL: I have just received your letter of this morning in regard to a portion of General Stoneman's cavalry still here.

When the President left Washington I received a dispatch by telegraph from the Secretary of War to send no more troops to the Army of the Potomac until the President's arrival.

After his return last evening I ordered transportation for the troops named in your note. They were embarking when the Secretary's dispatch was received to follow General Emory. The transportation for them will be ready to-morrow evening. I ought to have reported the receipt of the Secretary's dispatch, but in the multiplicity of my engagements it was forgotten.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX.

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., July 10, 1862

(Received Washington, D. C., July 10, 1862, 5 p.m.)

The PRESIDENT:

Governor Sprague is here. If I were to go to Washington I could advise but one thing-to place all the forces in North Carolina, Virginia,