War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0278 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, June 30, 1862.

Major-General DIX,

Fort Monroe:

It is not probable the enemy have abandoned the line between White House and McClellan's rear? He could have but little object to maintain it and nothing to subsist upon. Would not Stoneman better move up and see about it? I think a telegraphic communication can at once be opened to White House from Williamsburg. The wires must be up still.

A. LINCOLN.

FORT MONROE, June 30, 1862.

(Received 11 a.m.)

The President, ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

Everything has been done that is possible to open communication with General McClellan. I have sent an armed tug up the Chickahominy. Commodore Goldsborough sent up the James River, and Colonel Ingalls went up last night. We expect to hear to-day. At 10 o'clock yesterday the enemy had not occupied the point at White House. Our gunboats were still lying in the river, and the enemy's re-enforcements were only seen on the high ground a mile or two back. I cannot learn as yet whether they came this side of the White House. I shall soon have a report from Williamsburg.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, June 30, 1862-11 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Will you please say to President Lincoln that the report from Williamsburg is just in? The enemy had not been at White House at 8 o'clock last evening. Our pickets extend to New Kent Court-House 6 miles this side.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, June 30, 1862-2 p.m.

HONORABLE ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

We have no doubt that McClellan intended to abandon the White House. Our only line of communication with him by telegraph from that point would be along the railroad, which the enemy will hardly give up.

The communication of Commodore Goldsborough telegraphed to Gideon Welles, will have advised you that the general relies on the James River for all his communications hereafter. The commodore was with me an hour ago. I suggested that we should extend our wires from Williamsburg to the mouth of the Chickahominy and there communicate by the James River by steamers or carry them on the left bank of the river to Turkey Island Point, where the new depot is to be. The general has all the materials of the working party with him,