War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0272 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

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manders to have the names of the most distinguished non-commissioned officers and soldiers, who have proved their claim to promotion by their gallantry in the actions of the Peninsula, sent forward at once, with recommendations for acting appointments for the places to which it is desired they shall be commissioned.

The persons will at once enter on duty, and the commanding general will use every exertion to secure from the Governors of States the corresponding commissions.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

[S. WILLIAMS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 28, 1862.

The commanding general directs that you immediately cause your command to be provided with three days' rations in haversacks; ammunition sufficient to fill the boxes of the infantry and artillery; that the wagons that can be spared for the purpose be at once sent to the depots at Orchard Station and Savage Station for supplies of hard bread, sugar and coffee, and forage. These wagons, after being so loaded, will at once be sent through the White Oak Swamp via Savage Station, where they will wait further orders.

The usual reserve ammunition must be taken. Please acknowledge.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 28, 1862.

Care will be taken by commanders to send forward with their wagons all the intrenching tools in the possession of their commands.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 28, 1862.

It is a matter of vital importance that all the transportation of the army should in the movement now taking place be employed exclusively for the carrying of ammunition and subsistence. All tents and all articles not indispensable to the safety or maintenance of the troops must be abandoned and destroyed. A reasonable supply of hospital stores will be taken, and all the intrenching tools in the possession of the troops. All unnecessary officers' baggage will be left behind; the sick and wounded that are not able to walk must necessarily be left. Every provision for their comfort must be made. Subsistence must be left and medical stores for their use in liberal quantities. Medical officers will be left in charge of the sick and wounded, and a sufficient number of attendants to supply the requisite care. They should be