War of the Rebellion: Serial 014 Page 0261 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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a battery of regular artillery. I have at Fort Monroe 360 artillery, armed only with sabers, 222 infantry, and 18 field and staff; in all, 540; at Camp Hamilton and Hampton, 1,819 infantry and 90 cavalry; in all, 1,909; at Fort Wool and Sewell's Point, 254 infantry; at Norfolk and Portsmouth, 2,254 infantry, 309 mounted riflemen, and 80 artillery; in all, 2,643; at Suffolk, 2,769 infantry, 134 artillery, 412 cavalry, and staff, 10; in all, 3,325; at Yorktown and Gloucester, 1,319 infantry, 335 cavalry, and staff, 4; in all, 1,658; at Williamsburg, 466 cavalry, and at Newport News, 84 cavalry and 144 artillery; in all, 228. My whole force is 11,023, nearly one-third raw troops.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

June 26, 1862.

Brigadier-General VAN VLIET,

Chief Quartermaster, Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

It is proposed to send troops from Alexandria to the Pamunkey. You will please dispatch, with all possible speed, steam vessels, or vessels towed by steam, to move a division of 5,000 men-artillery, infantry, cavalry, and baggage trains-from Alexandria. As dispatch is of the utmost importance, much should be sacrificed to collect ample means for this movement. The transportation available here is about enough for 3,000 men, without horses or baggage or artillery, and will be at Alexandria to-morrow. It is supposed that within forty-eight hours you can have a portion of the vessels now within the Department of Virginia for service at Alexandria.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 26, 1862-11.15 p.m.

M. C. MEIGS:

It is all-important to send infantry here at once. We have an abundance of artillery. Please send every infantry soldier you can raise. I will have an abundance of transportation at Alexandria in the shortest possible time. We have had a very severe battle to-day, and the result is satisfactory. I presume that it will be renewed in the will be renewed in the morning.

VAN VLIET.

U. S. FLAG-SHIP MINNESOTA,

Norfolk, Va., June 26, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

SIR: I beg to assure you that everything in my power shall be done to further your reasonable requests, and this too with great pleasure on my part. I took it for granted that you had not even seen General Van Vliet's telegram to me.

To afford you any unexpected assistance I must be consulted before-hand, so as to make arrangements accordingly, as I keep all the vessels